Friday, May 22, 2020

Pros and Cons of Managed Care - 955 Words

Pros and Cons of Managed Care Some of the pros for managed care are; Preventive care — HMOs pay for programs, they are set up and are intended at keeping one healthy (yearly checkups, gym memberships, etc.)The idea is, so they won t have to pay for more costly services when and if one gets sick. Lower premiums — Because there are limits set as to which doctors one can see and when one can see them, HMOs charge a premium and usually they are lower premiums. Prescriptions — As part of their precautionary retreat, most prescriptions are covered by HMOs for a co-payment that also can be very low. Fewer unnecessary procedures —doctors are given financial incentives from HMOs , to provide only needed care, so doctors are less likely to†¦show more content†¦Those up on the hill have responded with a charge of state and national bills pointed at bringing in a booming healthcare industry that s pretty much free-for-all. For their part, the networks don t see what the entire objection is about. They say productiveness and peoples request will keep their guidelines just and within ones means. The networks are trying not only for cost, but also for class and peoples’ satisfaction. It s a patron service industry when you get right down to it. The network points to their absolute success in bringing down costs and keeping the mass of network enrollees happy. Each month people across the nation join a network, so it s plain that, Network care is here to stay in one shape or another. Those against and those rooting for that of managed care agree that the existence of unconstrained health care on demand is declining. As health care costs push very high yearly, some say it s time for all to comprehend that the medical healthcare industry has financial restrictions just like any other industry. People have been brought up to believe that health care is an entitlement, says (Jeanne Holland, executive director of Northeast Physicians-Hospital Organization) at Beverly Hospital. They think Life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and health care on demand. Consumers need to change their thinking. Resources http://ask.reference.com/related/History+of+Managed+Care?o=102545qsrc=121l=dir, Retrieved, October 26, 2010Show MoreRelatedThe Pros and Cons of a Managed Health Care System1472 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction A Health care system of any country is an important consideration for the purposes of the overall development. One of the most important and essential feature of the human body is the health and the systems. In the same manner, proper management is also necessary. Furthermore, all the countries of the world have few targets and achievements to be made. On the other hand, it should also be noted down that, economic development and social welfare the two most are the two important factorsRead More The Pros and Cons of Managed Mental Health Care Essay examples1462 Words   |  6 Pagesthe different effects managed care has on the quality of mental health care for its clients. On the positive, managed care has increased availability to a cliental that would otherwise not be able to afford mental health care. On the negative, there has been a reduction in quality in order for managed care corporations to keep costs low and still make money. Proper implementation of managed mental health care would likely result in high quality, low cost mental health care. Introduction Two decadesRead MoreWhat Is Managed Care?1462 Words   |  6 Pages What is managed care? According to the Oxford English Dictionary, managed care is â€Å"a system of health care in which patients agree to visit only certain doctors and hospitals, and in which the cost of treatment is monitored by a managing company.† Managed care is a variety of techniques designed to essentially reduce the cost of providing health benefits and advance the quality of care. In the United States alone, there are various managed care programs, that span from less restrictive to more restrictiveRead MoreFinancing and Structuring Health Care1115 Words   |  4 PagesFinancing and Structuring Health Care (1) Three main types of Health Insurance: The three major types of health insurance available in the US are Health Maintenance Organizations--HMOs, Point of Service plans--POS, Preferred Provider Organizations --PPOs. (Health Insurance Coverage, 2010) All the three coverage options come under managed care plans wherein the health insurers collaborate with healthcare providers to build networks. HMOs offer the most economical health insurance coverage, howeverRead MorePresident Lyndon B. Johnson1143 Words   |  5 Pageschange for a health care system that required help. He signed into law a bill that would provide health care for retirees, the disabled and the poor. The health coverage led to Medicare and Medicaid under Title XVIII of the Social Security Act to provide health insurance, (CMS. Gov., 2015). Likewise on March 23, 2010, President Barrack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law. Although it was a victory to some, it too would not only provide health care coverage to peopleRead MoreUs Healthcare Plan Vs. Uk Healthcare909 Words   |  4 PagesProtection and Affordable Care Act was enacted to increase the quality and affordability of insurance for Americans. The health-care system if funded by a patchwork of public and private insurance with large point-of-service fees. Care is provided through not-for-profit, private and public providers in a competitive delivery system. Pros: There are now more private coverage options than ever, and all major medical coverage options must provide minimum essential coverage. Affordable Care Act ensures thatRead MorePros and Cons of Healthcare999 Words   |  4 PagesPros and Cons of Managed care Written by Hassel Hamilton University of Axia Introduction Everyone knows what it is like being sick and cannot afford to see a doctor because of high cost of healthcare well I suggest that we take a look into the mirror and see the reflections of the Pros and cons of managed care , and traditional insurance before Making a change . Managed care Read MoreThe General Principles of Corporate Social Responsibility That Should Be Exercised by the Managers879 Words   |  4 Pageswithout financial incentives. In this case GE in the Jack Welch Era able to meet its primary economic responsibility to the society, as an evidence, GE able to generated high profit, Welch has managed to achieve the main goal for organizations which is profit maximization, it can be seen that GE able to took care their shareholders interest along with its directors and managers became multimillionaires in GE stock, extended to create prosperity for the society and nations by fulfilling its taxes responsibilityRead MoreThe General Principles of Corporate Social Responsibility That Should Be Exercised by the Managers889 Words   |  4 Pageswithout financial incentives. In this case GE in the Jack Welch Era able to meet its primary economic responsibility to the society, as an evidence, GE able to generated high profit, Welch has managed to achieve the main goal for organizations which is profit maximization, it can be seen that GE able to took care their shareholders interest along with its directors and managers became multimillionaires in GE stock, extended to create prosperity for the society and nations by fulfilling its taxes responsibilityRead MoreThe Pros And Cons Of Medicare Essay733 Words   |  3 PagesComprehensive Assignment Step 4 In discussion with two families, the pros and cons of Medicare are discussed. Melvin and Barbara Coats are above retirement age and until recently were both still working. Edward and Betty Florence are below retirement age, but Edward is disabled and hasn’t worked since 2007. Mr. Coats stated he had a heart attack needing five bypasses if not for his Medicare he would have lost his business and home due to the medical cost. Ms. Coats has worked and additional ten

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Life Without Electricity - 5146 Words

Life without electricity Imagine life without electricity, not just a brief power outage. We all know how inconvenient life becomes when our electricity is out for only a few hours. How hard it is to remember for that short period of time that the light switch will not produce instant light, the hair dryer will not immediately blow dry our hair, or that we cant even run water into our homes. Our homes and lives have become so dependent on electricity it is really hard to imagine everything that would change without it. Lifestyles in our own Ozark Mountain region have changed dramatically with the invention of electricity and its establishment into our everyday lives. Have you ever noticed a log cabin built at the very top of a high†¦show more content†¦English as a today’s communicating language There are many different languages in the world, and there are simply none more impactful than the English language. The English language is an amazing language, and it is beautiful. The shear amount of people who speak it are breath-taking, and there are many countries that teach the global language of communication in primary schools. With about 400 million people who speak it as their primary language, and the total of English speakers at nearly 2 billion people around the world, it is no wonder why this language is the global language of communication. Background and Origins Historically, the language that is language is one of West Germanic descent, with origins in Anglo-Saxon England. The language is a culmination of many words from many pre-existing languages around the world, but specifically influenced by the Old Norse language of the Vikings. After the Normans conquered, where we had Old English, it transformed into what we called Middle language, which was borrowed mostly from their language, as far as spelling and vocabulary are concerned. Shortly thereafter, Modern English was developed, coming along with what was called the Great Vowel Shift, which happened in 15th century English, where they incorporated words from a great score of different languages and dialects. In this, it is where we started using more and moreShow MoreRelatedGreatest Invention Essays1024 Words   |  5 Pageseveryday life with humans. There are many different possible world’s greatest inventions because they have all helped out humankind in some way, some more than others. I think that the greatest invention of all time is Harnessed Electricity. Some may argue that this was not an invention it was a discovery but although electricity itself was a discovery there was still the invention of had to use it and what it could be used for. I think that electricity is very important to human life because itRead Morea day without electricity753 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿An Entire Day Without Electricity For most people living in the industrialised world, electricity is one of the basic necessities. Electricity has become so ingrained with our everyday lives, that it is difficult to imagine living without it. This article explores what an ordinary day would look like in the life of a regular person if there suddenly were no electricity available for an entire day. Morning Unless you are lucky enough to wake up when the sun rises or you have a rooster in yourRead MoreThe Importance Of Electricity795 Words   |  4 Pages Electricity is very essential to America and only grows more important as more technology is invented. Electricity is what powers almost all of our daily equipment, such as our phones, our computers, or certain types of vehicles. Electricity also allows us to control traffic flow on the roads and on the interstate. Without electricity, we would still have dirt roads and horse-drawn carriages. We would not have items such as refrigerators, microwaves, or telephones. Without electricity, I wouldRead MoreFossil Fuels Is A Nonrenewable Resource1622 Words   |  7 PagesBahrain, Algeria and Libya. They are formed from the remains of fossil plant and animal life. We use fossil fuels to power our cars and airplanes, medicine, makeup, and to run many different types of appliances. Many products that are used everyday wouldn’t be available without the oil and gas extracted and processed from fossil fuels. Some advantages are being able to generate great amounts of electricity in one location, cost efficient and reliable, coal is becoming more and more available asRead MoreFive Important Scientific Discoveries1699 Words   |  7 Pagesexperiments whether we knew it or not and have come to conclusions about certain situation and why things are the way they are. Science had impacted the life of humans and there very lifestyle and is evident everywhere in every aspect of it. Till date, science is making more and more discoveries that promotes development and saves lives. But without the past scientific discoveries which acts as a foundation, that has been tremendously built on , science will not have reach the heights, it is reachingRead MoreGenerating Electricity1712 Words   |  7 PagesGenerating Electricity Criteria A - Criteria B Farzad Siganporia 11-C Today in our modern society, us humans take a variety of things for granted. One particularly, goes unnoticed. One, which we cannot live without, and one which changed our lives forever. ELECTRICITY. Electricity exists in a metropolis city, to aircrafts in the air to every remote corner on our earth. During the 1800s, British scientist Michael Faraday discovered the fundamentals of generating electricity. His method, which isRead MoreThe Architecture Of Wind Turbines1372 Words   |  6 Pagesfull circle, and this technology is there to accommodate for wind coming from any direction. It has increased productivity, and is key to the production of energy. The gearbox and generator are the most important aspect of a wind turbine because without, energy would not be produced. With better technology increasing the production of energy. There have been different three stages to the development of wind turbine technology; stage 1, which consist of constant speed turbine with a squirrel-cageRead MoreEssay On Rural Retrirification1014 Words   |  5 PagesSIGNFICANCE OF THE STUDY This study is important because it will guide the Government in future for making decision on expanding rural electrification program in areas without electricity and it will also encourage private participation in coming up with Mini Electrical Energy generation in rural areas like mini hydro, wind and Solar. It will also serve as a reference for ensuring that the Government has proper documentation on this area so that these positive impacts of rural electrification willRead MoreSaving Electricity - Led Technology1439 Words   |  6 Pages Saving Electricity - LED Technology in Lighting Equipment Raviteja Rudrapaka Fairleigh Dickinson University Author note This paper was prepared for EPS_5109_8O thought by Professor Kang –Suh. Abstract Electricity is one of the greatest inventions of human which makes an impactful change in technology. Electricity is essential component to modern technology. Many countries across globe are facing shortage of electricity during peak times. Still in some countries many people livingRead More Nikola Tesla Essay1590 Words   |  7 Pagesa system to distribute the electricity. One of Teslas gifts was an understanding of electricity. Edison promised Tesla large amounts of money if he could work out the kinks in Edisons DC system of electricity. In the end, Tesla saved Edison over $100,000 (which would be millions today), but Edison refused to live up to his end of the bargain. Tesla quit, and Edison spent the rest of his life trying to stifle Teslas reputation. Tesla devised a system for electricity, AC, which was better than Edisons

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Campaign Speech Free Essays

I can say that being an elementary pupil is both fun and challenging. Class discussions and homework, joining the school band or the ukulele ensemble, being in the choir, engaging in sports, giving intermission numbers during school programs, joining in various contests, or even doing the household chores that await us after school—these are the challenges that we face every day, and these are the same challenges that make our elementary days enjoyable and worth remembering. That is why I am so happy that a pupil’s government exists in our school, because through it, we can make our stay in our dear school even better than what we are already experiencing. We will write a custom essay sample on Campaign Speech or any similar topic only for you Order Now We now have a voice. And I would be honored to represent you guys and let your needs and desires be heard so that together with the teachers and school administrators, we can achieve that holistic and well-rounded education that all of us aspire to have. I feel that the candidates for this position are all qualified, but my love for our school and for the pupil population is what I can most of all boast about because that is my driving force to run and hopefully serve. I am actually excited of what you and me can do together if I would be elected, and you can expect that I would not put your votes to waste and that I will deliver my best. With that said, I humbly ask for your votes. Don’t forget to put my name, Kyle Antonette C. Delubio, for vice president in the ballot. Thank you and good day! How to cite Campaign Speech, Papers

Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Physics investigation- stopping distance Essay Example

Physics investigation- stopping distance Paper Introduction In my investigation I intend to gather enough evidence and explanation to see if and how the mass of a ball will affect its stopping distance. I will carry out a series of tests starting with changing the mass of the ball then changing height which its dropped from. Predictions I predict that the mass of a ball will most defiantly affect the distance it takes to stop because as the mass increases, the amount of friction with the surface will increase which will slow down the ball sooner. I believe if the mass of the ball is doubled the friction with the surface its on will double and therefore half the distance taken to stop. Equipment For my investigation the equipment I will require is: * A ramp and stand ( 1 metre long) * Carpet (2 by 0. 5 metres) * 2 balls of different masses but same size ( ball 1, 2. 8g and ball 2, 44. 9g) * 2 metre rules My setup My setup is pretty simple I will use a ramp with a rule along it and some carpet for the balls to roll along I will then use another rule to measure the distance taken to stop. When I first set up my equipment the balls where rolling around everywhere, to overcome this problem I decided to curl the carpet into a half bowl shape the balls then rolled smoothly down the ramp and along the carpet. Procedure Firstly I will drop the lighter ball 1, and measure its stopping distance and record this result; I will then drop the same ball another 4 times and record those results. I will average the 5 repeated results in order to gain a fair distance for the stopping distance of each ball. I will then repeat this with ball 2 and accumulate an average. All other variables for now will be kept the same (i.e. gradient of ramp, height dropped from) Test 1 In my first test I will be testing ball 1 of radius 2 cm and mass of 2. 8g, against ball 2 of radius 2 cm and mass of 44. 9g. I will be dropping the ball from 30cm up the ramp with gradient of 24. 4i , my results are: Ball 1 (cm) Ball 2 (cm) 1 115 83 2 99 84 3 108 84 4 114 87 5 112 88 Average 109. 6 85. 2 Analysis My first test supports my prediction that the mass of a ball does affect the distance that it takes to stop, although ball 2 is over 16 times heavier so I would have expected the stopping distance to be shorter. Test 2. We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Again I will use ball 1 and ball 2 but this time I will drop them from a height of 40cm up the ramp with gradient 24. 4i , my results are: Ball 1(cm) Ball 2(cm) 1 137 94 2 122 100 3 130 98 4 123 101 5 121 102 Average 126. 6 99 Analysis As I expected when the dropping height was increased the relationship is the same just the distances are longer, I soon realised a fatly floor in my experiment the 2 balls were made out of 2 different materials so the coefficient of friction between the 2 balls and the surface would be different for each ball making my investigation unfair and inaccurate. I decided to use a toy car and change the mass of the car by adding weights to it, this will mean that the coefficient of friction will be the same for all my tests. New equipment   toy car weights   blue tac (to attach weights to car) Test 3 Here I will be using the toy car of mass 17. 4g, and I will add 17. 4g so the cars mass will have doubled and I will further use the car plus 100g to see how this affects the stopping distance, my results are. Car no added mass (cm) Car plus Analysis From these results it is clear that my prediction is only partially correct as the mass of an object does affect its stopping distance but the relationship is not as linearly as I expected, as the mass is doubled the stopping distance is not halved this is due to the momentum that the object gains, when more mass is added the object gains more momentum proven with the momentum formulae momentum = mass velocity, so the object will travel feather with more mass, this will explain why when the mass of my car had an extra 100g it travelled a further 77. 2 cm. Although its not that simple because we have to take into account friction, as the mass increases the gravitational pull of the earth will increase which in turn increases the amount of friction between the car wheels and the surface they roll on and a greater friction will slow down the car and reduce its stopping distance, this will explain why when I added only 17. 4g the stopping distance was less . In theory there should be a certain mass that when added to an object the stopping distance will not change as the amount of extra momentum it gains will be cancelled out with the increased friction. I will extend my investigation to try and work out this quantity of mass. Test 4 Here I will again be using a toy car and I will change the mass using weights from 20g up to 90g, dropping the car from a height of 10cm and gradien Distance taken to stop (cm) Analysis. Analysing my results soon after the test I noticed a pattern within my results, although at mass 80g this was not true I decided to repeat the 80g run and found that the distance was actual higher and fit in with my other results. Total mass of car (g) Plotting a graph of my results shows the trend more clearly. As you can see from 20g 40g the stopping distance of the car decreases this is where the extra mass produces more friction than momentum, after this from 40g 90g the stopping distance increases where the momentum is now greater than the friction, due to time restrictions I will only be able to make an estimate of the extra mass needed for friction and momentum to balance I will base my estimate on the results collected and my graph, the turning point is in between 40g and 50g so I will extrapolate from these to points in order to make my estimate. Conclusion In my experiment I aimed to find out whether or not the mass of a ball affects its stopping distance and if so how does it. I started out thinking I knew what was going to happened and that friction was the only point to consider, after my second test I knew something wasnt right and decided to use the toy car, using the toy car was a massive benefit as I could change the mass so much easier and all other variables where kept the same (e. g. coefficient of friction). It was my first set of results with the toy car when I realised I had to take into account momentum this then explained everything about my previous results and everything fell into place. Feathering my investigation out of pure interest I decided to work out the balancing mass of friction and momentum but due to time restrictions I am only able to make an estimate of 42g due to extrapolating my graph. I enjoyed my physics investigation and wish I had more time to further it more. Physics investigation- stopping distance Essay Example Physics investigation- stopping distance Paper Introduction In my investigation I intend to gather enough evidence and explanation to see if and how the mass of a ball will affect its stopping distance. I will carry out a series of tests starting with changing the mass of the ball then changing height which its dropped from. Predictions I predict that the mass of a ball will most defiantly affect the distance it takes to stop because as the mass increases, the amount of friction with the surface will increase which will slow down the ball sooner. I believe if the mass of the ball is doubled the friction with the surface its on will double and therefore half the distance taken to stop. Equipment For my investigation the equipment I will require is: * A ramp and stand ( 1 metre long) * Carpet (2 by 0. 5 metres) * 2 balls of different masses but same size ( ball 1, 2. 8g and ball 2, 44. 9g) * 2 metre rules My setup My setup is pretty simple I will use a ramp with a rule along it and some carpet for the balls to roll along I will then use another rule to measure the distance taken to stop. When I first set up my equipment the balls where rolling around everywhere, to overcome this problem I decided to curl the carpet into a half bowl shape the balls then rolled smoothly down the ramp and along the carpet. Procedure Firstly I will drop the lighter ball 1, and measure its stopping distance and record this result; I will then drop the same ball another 4 times and record those results. I will average the 5 repeated results in order to gain a fair distance for the stopping distance of each ball. I will then repeat this with ball 2 and accumulate an average. All other variables for now will be kept the same (i.e. gradient of ramp, height dropped from) Test 1 In my first test I will be testing ball 1 of radius 2 cm and mass of 2. 8g, against ball 2 of radius 2 cm and mass of 44. 9g. I will be dropping the ball from 30cm up the ramp with gradient of 24. 4i , my results are: Ball 1 (cm) Ball 2 (cm) 1 115 83 2 99 84 3 108 84 4 114 87 5 112 88 Average 109. 6 85. 2 Analysis My first test supports my prediction that the mass of a ball does affect the distance that it takes to stop, although ball 2 is over 16 times heavier so I would have expected the stopping distance to be shorter. Test 2. We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Physics investigation- stopping distance specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Again I will use ball 1 and ball 2 but this time I will drop them from a height of 40cm up the ramp with gradient 24. 4i , my results are: Ball 1(cm) Ball 2(cm) 1 137 94 2 122 100 3 130 98 4 123 101 5 121 102 Average 126. 6 99 Analysis As I expected when the dropping height was increased the relationship is the same just the distances are longer, I soon realised a fatly floor in my experiment the 2 balls were made out of 2 different materials so the coefficient of friction between the 2 balls and the surface would be different for each ball making my investigation unfair and inaccurate. I decided to use a toy car and change the mass of the car by adding weights to it, this will mean that the coefficient of friction will be the same for all my tests. New equipment   toy car weights   blue tac (to attach weights to car) Test 3 Here I will be using the toy car of mass 17. 4g, and I will add 17. 4g so the cars mass will have doubled and I will further use the car plus 100g to see how this affects the stopping distance, my results are. Car no added mass (cm) Car plus Analysis From these results it is clear that my prediction is only partially correct as the mass of an object does affect its stopping distance but the relationship is not as linearly as I expected, as the mass is doubled the stopping distance is not halved this is due to the momentum that the object gains, when more mass is added the object gains more momentum proven with the momentum formulae momentum = mass velocity, so the object will travel feather with more mass, this will explain why when the mass of my car had an extra 100g it travelled a further 77. 2 cm. Although its not that simple because we have to take into account friction, as the mass increases the gravitational pull of the earth will increase which in turn increases the amount of friction between the car wheels and the surface they roll on and a greater friction will slow down the car and reduce its stopping distance, this will explain why when I added only 17. 4g the stopping distance was less . In theory there should be a certain mass that when added to an object the stopping distance will not change as the amount of extra momentum it gains will be cancelled out with the increased friction. I will extend my investigation to try and work out this quantity of mass. Test 4 Here I will again be using a toy car and I will change the mass using weights from 20g up to 90g, dropping the car from a height of 10cm and gradien Distance taken to stop (cm) Analysis. Analysing my results soon after the test I noticed a pattern within my results, although at mass 80g this was not true I decided to repeat the 80g run and found that the distance was actual higher and fit in with my other results. Total mass of car (g) Plotting a graph of my results shows the trend more clearly. As you can see from 20g 40g the stopping distance of the car decreases this is where the extra mass produces more friction than momentum, after this from 40g 90g the stopping distance increases where the momentum is now greater than the friction, due to time restrictions I will only be able to make an estimate of the extra mass needed for friction and momentum to balance I will base my estimate on the results collected and my graph, the turning point is in between 40g and 50g so I will extrapolate from these to points in order to make my estimate. Conclusion In my experiment I aimed to find out whether or not the mass of a ball affects its stopping distance and if so how does it. I started out thinking I knew what was going to happened and that friction was the only point to consider, after my second test I knew something wasnt right and decided to use the toy car, using the toy car was a massive benefit as I could change the mass so much easier and all other variables where kept the same (e. g. coefficient of friction). It was my first set of results with the toy car when I realised I had to take into account momentum this then explained everything about my previous results and everything fell into place. Feathering my investigation out of pure interest I decided to work out the balancing mass of friction and momentum but due to time restrictions I am only able to make an estimate of 42g due to extrapolating my graph. I enjoyed my physics investigation and wish I had more time to further it more.

Friday, March 20, 2020

How does Shakespeare present love through Romeo and Juliet and a selection of his sonnets Essays

How does Shakespeare present love through Romeo and Juliet and a selection of his sonnets Essays How does Shakespeare present love through Romeo and Juliet and a selection of his sonnets Paper How does Shakespeare present love through Romeo and Juliet and a selection of his sonnets Paper Essay Topic: Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare presents love as a polarizing force through both Romeo and Juliet and a selection of his sonnets. Unrequited and courtly, it evokes feelings of great anguish yet when reciprocated and true, brings great joy, albeit in fleeting moments. Spiritual love can evolve into a pure entity, transcending physical attraction and even death – also allowing the protagonists of the play to transcend the bitter feud of their families. Shakespeare first presents the idea of unrequited love in Romeo and Juliet as being afflictive and filled with despair – Romeo is a typical Petrarchan, courtly lover in Act 1 Scene 1; his feelings of love have not been reciprocated by Rosaline, and this causes him to dwell on his emotional torment. Romeo shuts himself in his room and ‘makes himself an artificial night’, he isolates himself in complete darkness to represent his state of deep depression and suffering. He uses the exaggerated cliches of typical Petrarchan poetry to illustrate his suffering, for example â€Å"Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health†. Here, the lightness of the feather could represent the lightness one feels during love, contrasting with the heaviness of lead, to represent how unrequited love causes a heavy heart. Romeo uses these oxymorons to blend the joys of love with the emotional anguish of unrequited love and also to demonstrate his mixed emotions felt for Rosaline. These descriptions additionally show us that most of his understanding of love has been taken from the typical courtly/ Petrarchan love they are filled with the feelings of great torment usually accompanied with this type of love. Courtly love is an idealized, infatuated form of love in which a courtier devotes himself to an unattainable woman (usually married). Romeo’s use of traditional Petrarchan cliches portray him as a young, inexperienced lover who is more fixated on the concept of love depicted in Petrarchan poetry, rather than actually being in love. The Elizabethan audience Romeo and Juliet would have been performed to would have been very aware of the idea of courtly/ Petrarchan love in poetry, as they were heavily exposed to the poetry of Sir Thomas Wyatt and Sir Philip Sidney. Unrequited love that causes torment and great suffering is similarly explored in Sonnet 28. In the poem, the speaker personifies day and night as forces that, though usually are at odds with one another, work together to â€Å"oppress† him. They â€Å"shake hands† – usually the oppression brought by the toils of day would be â€Å"eas’d by night†, in that the speaker could rest but he complains that this is not the case as he is plagued by thoughts of how far away he remains from his love. The speaker hopes the ‘oppression’ of day and night may be stopped with flattery. â€Å"Thou art bright and dost him grace when clouds do blot the heaven† – the speaker’s object of affection is ‘bright’; when it is cloudy his beloved takes the place of the sun so day can be just as beautiful. He also flatters the night with ‘when sparkling stars twire not, though gild’st the even’ – again ‘thou’ refers to the beloved of the speaker (the fair youth), who shines to make the night beautiful when the stars ‘twire not’. Because of the misery felt by the speaker in Sonnet 28 during both day and night, he can be linked to Romeo in Act 1 Scene 1, who similarly suffers the torment of his unrequited love during both day and night. Romeo suffers from ‘still-waking sleep’ and we learn from Benvolio and Lord Montague that he walks the streets of Verona â€Å"an hour before the woshipp’d sun peer’d forth from the golden window of the east†, â€Å"with tears augmenting the morning’s dew†. Thus, like the speaker in Sonnet 28, Romeo finds no rest or relief from his suffering at night. The use of the opposites of day and night in Sonnet 28 also links to the oxymorons used by Romeo in Act 1 Scene 1; the contrasts used by the speaker and Romeo again highlight their mixed emotions and distressed state of mind. The love between Romeo and Juliet is presented as being spiritual and sacred, highly contrasting with Romeo’s past infatuation for Rosaline. Romeo and Juliet’s entire first conversation is an intertwined fourteen line sonnet in which they develop a complicated religious metaphor. The sonnet is typically associated with the theme of love; it is clear that the pair are falling in love but also the rigid, ‘flawless’ form of a sonnet suggests their shared love will be perfect. The fact that Romeo and Juliet share the sonnet is significant, as their love is shared, contrasting with unrequited love Romeo had for Rosaline at the beginning of the play, and also contradicting the love described in typical Petrarchan sonnets. Shakespeare also presents the love between Romeo and Juliet as spiritual and sacred, through the use of the extended metaphor in the shared sonnet. However before the shared sonnet, Romeo notices her from a distance and describes her using light images which suggest the physical attraction felt for her, for example ‘she doth teach the torches to burn bright! ’ Rosaline was always associated with dark imagery, but throughout the play Juliet is always portrayed in light, white images, suggesting her purity but also the fact that she shall bring Romeo out of his darkness of courtly love and teach him to love profoundly. These contrasts of light and dark imagery are further explored when he compares Juliet to a rich jewel in an Ethiopes ear† upon seeing her from across the ballroom. ‘Rich jewel’ obviously signifies that she is precious and he imagines Juliet shining out against darkness. Darkness is an important aspect of their love, as they can only be together when the day is over. Romeo’s contrasts of Juliet against dark images could signify that her beauty contrasts with and stands out against the darkness of the night they meet in. During the sonnet, Romeo compares Juliet to a ‘holy shrine’ and his lips to ‘two blushing pilgrims’; the use of ‘holy shrine’ illustrates that Romeo’s love for Juliet is elevated, but also the religious metaphor and the purity of the sonnet shows that their love is sacred. The religious overtones associate their love with purity and sacredness, transcending the physical attraction experienced when they first meet. The fact that the sonnet so naturally fits into the dialogue of the scene highlights the compatibility of the two– they speak in shared verse, complementing each other to create a fixed meter and rhyme scheme. There may also be a darker purpose to Shakespeare’s use of the sonnet form here. It echoes the opening sonnet, reminding the audience that Romeo and Juliet are ‘star cross’d lovers’ and doomed to a tragic fate. Shakespeare also explores a true, pure love in Sonnet 116. Shakespeare infuses marital language to demonstrate a true love; traditional marriage vows are echoed in the word ‘impediment’ and in his choice to describe true love as a ‘marriage’ of true minds. Although there is some ambiguity in whether the sonnet is describing a platonic or romantic love, the use of the word ‘alter’ could also suggest a wedding altar – again infusing marital language, suggesting that the love implied is romantic. The quote ‘the marriage of true minds’ itself, suggests the joining together of two compatible intellects, associating with the compatibility of Romeo and Juliet where their shared sonnet seems to fit their dialogue naturally. Spiritual love is also explored in Sonnet 116, presented through Shakespeare’s choice to use the word ‘minds’ rather than a physical image (such as bodies), implying that the love described supersedes physical attraction to a spiritual level. By describing love using ‘star’, it implies that it is celestial; further illustrating that the love presented is spiritual. The power of love and its ability to transcend even death is also explored in both Sonnet 116 and Romeo and Juliet. Some words of the sonnet are repeated, for example ‘alter’ and ‘alteration, and ‘remover’ and ‘remove’; these specific words again highlight that true love is spiritual as beauty may fade but this true love does not. However, these words also suggest that love is unchanging and eternal. The repetition emphasises that love has a sense of constancy (it is everlasting), which links to the end of Romeo and Juliet, where Romeo say’s â€Å"Thus with a kiss I die† and Juliet mirrors with â€Å"I will kiss thy lips; Haply, some poison yet doth hang on them†. Their love is perpetual their love which birthed with a kiss now ends with one. Love outlasting death in both Sonnet 116 and Romeo and Juliet again presents love as being eternal and everlasting. For example, in Romeo and Juliet in Act 5 Scene 3, Romeo says â€Å"Shall I believe that unsubstantial death is amorous†; he asks this bitterly, believing that Juliet is so beautiful that death has preserved her to be deaths own lover, suggesting that Juliet – along with her love for Romeo – lives on after death. The audience is aware that Romeo is seeing the physical signs of Juliets recovery from drug-induced sleep – it is ironic that his attraction to her even in death encourages him to press onward with his own suicide, just as she is about to awaken. Throughout this scene, death becomes an act of love for Romeo, as he thinks that suicide will allow him to be reunited with Juliet. Shakespeare also demonstrates the true love having the ability to transcend death in Sonnet 116 through ‘but bears it out to the edge of doom’, with ‘doom’ referring to doomsday. Here, love can stand the width of time and does not change appearance or position, thus suggesting everlasting love can overcome even death. Shakespeare uses language associated with extremes to show the power of love, confirming love as a positive force that triumphs over the prospect of doom. As Romeo and Juliet are the only two characters in the entirety of the play that can dismiss their families’ feud, it implies the power of their love. Love is also shown to empower Juliet as her language and actions are quite forward and mature. While love seems to bring out Romeo’s rash nature and resulting naivety, Juliet (in contrast) appears mature for her years. She encourages him to make the first move when she says ‘Saints do not move; though grant for prayer’ meaning that saints (usually as they are represented by statues) do not move, but she could also be referencing the other meaning of the word ‘move’ (to start something) suggesting her reluctance to make the first move, but also hinting that his ‘prayer’ is likely to be granted, encouraging him to kiss her. This is surprising for the era as in Shakespeare’s day women were subservient to men; the man would always be dominant in the relationship. Juliet’s forwardness demonstrates how she defies common convention and her maturity as a lover, but also how her love for Romeo empowers her. Shakespeare demonstrates how the themes of love and hate are inextricably linked in his presentation of how Romeo and Juliet seem to never be able to escape the feud between their families. At the very beginning of the play, we see a fight between servants of the Montagues and the Capulets in the streets of Verona, revealing how the conflict between the two families has infiltrated every layer of society; from the servants to the lords. Romeo and Juliet are the only two characters that can dismiss the feud, highlighting the fact that their shared love is unchanging and true. For example, in Act 2 Scene 2, Juliet says â€Å"That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet; so Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d†; she tells Romeo that a name is a meaningless convention and refuses to believe that Romeo is defined by his name, therefore implying that the two can love each other without fear of the social repercussions. However, earlier on in the play, Tybalt says â€Å"talk of peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. † This again shows the bitterness of the hate between the Montagues and the Capulets; he suggests the two families will never achieve peace. However the feuding between the Montagues and the Capulets, both families belonging to aristocracy, was not seen as something uncommon by the Elizabethan audience. The upper classes were notorious for fighting each other in order to increase their economic and social influence. Clashes of supporters of two households in the streets of the city were often seen during Elizabeth’s reign – the authorites obviously did not approve and Prince Escalus’ appearance and speech in the first scene was common to Shakespeares audience. The themes of love and hate being linked is further presented throughout Romeo and Juliet, where scenes of love between the ‘star-cross’d lovers’ are often followed by scenes of hate and violence. For example in Act 2 Scene 4 (the scene before the marriage of Romeo and Juliet) Tybalt, Juliet’s cousin, challenges Romeo to fight a duel with him; no other characters but the lovers can dismiss the feud, also illustrating that their love is true and sincere. Shakespeare also presents strong themes of erotic love and lust in both Romeo and Juliet and Sonnet 128 as being more associated with infatuation than true, romantic love. We see that in Romeo and Juliet, many characters perceive love in terms of sexual conquest rather than affection. For example, Juliet’s nurse’s seems to associate marriage with sexual intercourse and having children and this is shown when she quotes her husband â€Å"thou wilt fall backwards when thou com’st to age† after Juliet had fallen over when she was younger. This suggests that she sees sex as the main aspect of marriage. This is further highlighted in the quote â€Å"women grow by men†, referring to Juliet’s potential coupling with Paris and the way she will increase her social status in marrying him. Alternatively, the nurse may be suggesting the literal consequences of sex – pregnancy – linking to her previous ideas about sex and child bearing being the predominant factor in marriage, rather than love. Similar ideas are evident in the attitude of Mercutio, where he advises Romeo to sexually conquer other women to move on from Rosaline, shown in the quote â€Å"prick love for pricking†. Here, the image of a rose is used ironically; the image is traditionally affiliated with romantic love, highlighting Mercutio’s crudeness and the way in which he objectifies women. His views may derive from the fact that the women of Shakespeare’s day had very little ascendency and were viewed as beneath men in social hierarchy; they were considered property and often viewed as objects for men to sexually possess. Ideas about erotic love are also explored in Sonnet 128, where Shakespeare describes the act of the ‘dark lady’ playing a virginal using many sexual innuendoes, implying his lust for her. ‘I envy those jacks that nimble leap, to kiss the tender inward of thy hand’ expresses his desire to physically possess his mistress, ‘the dark lady’; he is jealous that the keys get to touch his lady’s fingers, emphasizing his longing to be intimate with her. With thy sweet fingers when thou gently swayst’ demonstrates the soft way in which his mistress plays the virginal; the speaker is jealous of his mistress touching the instrument rather than him and fantasizes about kissing the woman in the same tender, controlling manner that she uses when playing. The speaker’s desire to be physically intimate with his mistress is also highlighted in the quote ‘At the woods boldness by thee blushing stand! referencing how he ‘blushes’ at the key’s braveness in jumping up and touching the ‘dark lady’s’ hands. Alternatively, the ‘wood’s boldness could connote a man’s erection – thus illustrating the speaker’s sexual lust towards her. The image of a man’s erection is further suggested in the next line ‘To be so tickled, they would change their state’, however this line may also be referring to the speaker’s lips, which if were to be ‘tickled’ like those keys are, would gladly be transformed into wood and change places with the keys. The use of imagery to represent the male genitalia can further be linked back to Mercutio when he taunts Romeo about Rosaline in the quote â€Å"Now will he sit under a medlar tree, and wish his mistress were that kind of fruit as maids call medlars†. A medlar is a small, round fruit with an apricot-like cleft that opens up when ripe and ready to eat; Mercutio equates this with the female genitalia, which remain closed until said lady is ready to ‘open up’, further highlighting his crudeness and how he reduces love to sex. Mercutio says that Romeo wants to be around ‘medlars’ and that he wishes Rosaline was like a medlar (ripe and ready to ‘open up’), demonstrating his ideas about love, in relation to them being purely sexual. Mercutio furthers the sexual imagery with open et caetera (in Shakespearian English this refers to the ‘open’ female genitalia), and â€Å"poperin pear†, referring to the male genitalia, but also possibly sounding like â€Å"pop her in†; Mercutio wants Romeo to engage in sexual relations with Rosaline. Structurally, this passage of speech highlights Romeo’s maturity and the difference in his perceptions of love, in comparison to Mercutio’s objectification of women. It features in Act 2 Scene 1, directly in between the scene in which Romeo and Juliet meet and fall in love and the famous balcony scene, Act 2 Scene 2, in which their love is further developed. Mercutio’s use of crude language again emphasizes how lust in Romeo and Juliet is presented as being a form of infatuation, in comparison to a true, spiritual love.

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Feedstock in Chemistry and Engineering

Feedstock in Chemistry and Engineering A feedstock refers to any unprocessed material used to supply a manufacturing process. Feedstocks are bottleneck assets because their availability determines the ability to make products. In its most general sense, a feedstock is a natural material (e.g., ore, wood, seawater, coal) that has been transformed for marketing in large volumes. In engineering, particularly as it relates to energy, a feedstock refers specifically to a renewable, biological material that can be converted into energy or fuel. In chemistry, a feedstock is a chemical used to support a large-scale chemical reaction. The term usually refers to an organic substance. Also Known As: A feedstock may also be called a  raw material or unprocessed material. Sometimes feedstock is a synonym for biomass. Examples of Feedstocks Using the broad definition of a feedstock, any natural resource might be considered an example, including any mineral, vegetation, or air or water. If it can be mined, grown, caught, or collected and isnt produced by man, its a raw material. When a feedstock is a renewable biological substance, examples include crops, woody plants, algae, petroleum, and natural gas.  Specifically, crude oil is a feedstock for the production of gasoline. In the chemical industry, petroleum is a feedstock for a host of chemicals, including methane, propylene, and butane. Algae is a feedstock for hydrocarbon fuels, Corn is a feedstock for ethanol.

Monday, February 17, 2020

N Health Care or Oil and Gas that has greater relevance to the Houston Research Paper

N Health Care or Oil and Gas that has greater relevance to the Houston economy - Research Paper Example The Department of Health and Human Services in Houston is charged with the duty of working with health care providers plus the community with the intention of promoting good health and improving health services offered to citizens (Nathan, 2009). There are a number of duties that the health department is charged with. Examples of the roles include implementation of programs intended to reduce the prevalence and effect of varied communicable diseases like Swine flu and HIV, keeping track of the environmental conditions like air quality and overseeing animal control and inspecting food establishments and local restaurants to make sure that no health threats are introduced to the lives of the dinners. To operate a food service establishment, a permit would be required of the food dealers. A permit would be given to a food establishment only after it meets every requirement that has been set by Houston food ordinance. There are educational services offered to help managers or workers create and maintain safer food service operations. The services also help the workers comply with Houston food ordinance-set requirements. Education pertaining to food safety is provided using a number of ways. One way in of carrying out the exercise is the condition requiring that every manager attends classes then passes a written test centered on food safety prior to certification as a food service manager. The remaining section of the paper focuses on a detailed analysis and recommendations of appropriate mitigation techniques applicable on the risks that a project manager overseeing the execution of the E- Learning software project has to contend with Apart from roles like project planning and communication, project managers are also charged with the duty of risk management. Risks management in software projects entails identification, quantification and management of risks (Wysocki, 2013). Every project features some amount of risk. For instance, a project meant